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Humpback Whales Songs Sounds Vocalizations

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Humpback Whales Songs Sounds Vocalizations




Ownership: Information presented on this website (National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Department of the Interior), unless otherwise indicated , is considered in the public domain. It may may be distributed or copied as is permitted by the law. Generally speaking, works created by U.S. Government employees are not eligible for copyright protection in the United States. See Circular 1 "COPYRIGHT BASICS" from the U.S. Copyright Office.

The recordings available here were made by the National Park Service, using a hydrophone that is anchored near the mouth of Glacier Bay, Alaska for the purpose of monitoring ambient noise. The recordings are intended to provide examples of the types of natural and manmade sounds that occur in Glacier Bay National Park.

Whale Sounds, Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) Humpback whale song is thought to be a male breeding display that is prominent in their wintering grounds, and previously thought to be quite rare in the feeding areas. It is called a song because it is a long, complex vocalization that repeats in a predictable pattern. Whale song recordings from Glacier Bay have been made only in the fall, when perhaps the hormonal changes that spur whales to migrate are beginning to occur.

Feeding call is a sterotyped vocalization typically used during humpback whale coordinated group feeding. In the Glacier Bay area, it typically occurs 15-20 seconds before a group of whales all surface together after a foraging dive. This specialized call is common in some localities but rare in others. It may be used for group coordination, (ready, set, go!) or to scare/concentrate the schooling fish that are their prey.

Unstructured sounds. The most common humpback whale vocalization in Bartlett Cove was the simple âwhupâ, made with no discernable pattern. The track entitled âmoo etcâis a sample of common humpback whale vocalizations on a somewhat windy day. Whales can also make non-vocal sounds by slapping their tail, flippers or other body parts on the water (for example during a breach). These sounds can carry for hundreds of meters and seem to provide another way for whales to communicate with one another over distance. As you will hear twice near the end of the cut titled âwheezeblow etcâ, even the whaleâs breathing can be audible at some distance, especially wheeze blows. In one of the recordings, the sound of repeated tail slaps overlaps with the loud, high-pitched whining of a propeller in bad repair, perhaps indicating that the sound disturbed the whale.

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Reviews

Reviewer: konstantinos-000 - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - January 2, 2014
Subject: Wonder of nature
It is more than a feeling when you have the chance to hear or see these creatures.
Thanks to an audio like this i imagine swimming with them!
Reviewer: barnard67 - favoritefavoritefavoritefavoritefavorite - January 2, 2014
Subject: playback
These beautiful creatures are as beautiful as they sound.
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